Giant Robots are GO!

As of one o’clock this morning I finished the draft of Giant Robots of Tunguska, bringing it home at 53,839 words. I created the Scrivener document on the evening of February 20th, and finished it in the early morning of May 25th– so it took me three months and five days to write making it my fastest ever novel.

Now it’s planning the next one, editing book three, and looking at the other novels I have in the drafting stages.

 

 

 

 

Pulling it All Together

As I write this I’m coming into the final stretch on Doc Vandal book 4, Giant Robots of Tunguska. Everyone’s in a bad situation, even the characters who don’t realize it, and it’s time to pull all the threads together.

Some writers plan everything out with a detailed outline so they know exactly what’s going to happen next: I’m not one of those writers. I have a rough outline and I know where I want all the pieces to end up. What I don’t know is exactly how they’re going to get there.

It’s also where I go back and look for any dangling plot threads I need to tie up. This would be a ton easier if I could just stick to my outline, but I can’t. The story I end up with is never exactly what I planned.

However, not knowing exactly where I’ll end up and how I’ll get there helps make the writing fun. It’s like reading the book to find out what happens, only much slower.

 

Air Pirates are GO!

It’s launch day. Air Pirates of Krakatoa is now live in the Kindle store. It’s been a long slog, over two years since I finished the first draft, but it’s available now.

This was the one that really determined the direction of the series; so much so that I went back and revised Against the Eldest Flame so that it fit better with the sequel. Characters found their own voices and their world opened up.

I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did.

 

Everything Was Bigger Between the Wars

Zeppelins weren’t the only example of huge flying machines. Norman Bel Geddes’ Airliner No.4 is a perfect example of pulp technology. With a 528 foot wingspan, this giant flying wing was designed to carry passengers across the country in the lap of luxury. Although it was never built, all the evidence indicates that this twenty-engine behemoth would have actually flown.

Even though the design was heavier than air, the design had so much empty space that for all practical purposes the interior was air.

It didn’t just carry passengers; its nine decks provided room for over 150 crew, many of whom would have been equally at home in a spa or private gym. Unfortunately, no one ever came up with the money to build it.

That’s the beauty of pulp technology: Nobody could say they were afraid to think big.

Naturally, one was built in Doc’s world; but that’s a story for another day.

 

 

Launch Day

In another world it’s 1937 and Doc Vandal fights evil along with Victoria (Vic) Frank, Gus the Gorilla, and Gilly Chanter from his headquarters on the 87th floor of the Republic State Building.

That’s the premise of my new series beginning¬†with Against the Eldest Flame.

In this blog I want to share both the adventures I’m creating and their inspirations. ¬†The 1930’s were an incredible decade, and I want to explore it in good company. Welcome aboard.